Quick Answer: What Is The Difference Between Their?

How do you properly use your?

When to Use “Your” as a Possessive Adjective It lets us know to whom the noun belongs, and it comes before a noun in the sentence.

Your is a second person possessive adjective that is used as both the singular and plural form..

What is an example of?

“Its” refers to the possessive form of the pronoun “it.” For example, when referring to a pair of shoes, you might say, “That’s not its box.” Meanwhile, “it’s” is the contraction for the words “it is” or “it has.” For example, “It’s (it is) going to be a fabulous night” or “It’s (it has) been a fabulous night.”

How do you learn there Their?

There, They’re, Their RulesThere. Use there to refer to a physical or abstract place. … They’re. Use they’re as a contraction for they are. … Their. Use their to show possession, commonly followed by a noun.

When should you use which or that?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

Where do we use over in a sentence?

Over sentence examplesHe is famous all over the world. … What are you doing over here? … I don’t want a shadow hanging over him. … You see it all over the Internet. … He pulled the undershirt over his head before answering. … I am His gaze wandered over her face again.More items…

How do you remember there and their?

Homophones: They’re, There, and TheirThey’re. This is the easiest of the three because it’s a contraction, which means that the word itself is actually two words shortened and joined by an apostrophe: They + are = they’re. … There. The trick to remembering how to use there is hidden inside the word itself. … Their. Their is a possessive pronoun.

Is its correct?

Remember: When the word is a contraction of “it is” or “it has,” the correct choice is it’s. Otherwise, the correct choice is its. … The sentence begins with a contraction of “it has” (it’s) and then needs a possessive form (its).

How do you know which to use?

Take a hint from the spelling!Their has the word heir in it, which can act as a reminder that the term indicates possession.There has the word here in it. There is the choice when talking about places, whether figurative or literal.They’re has an apostrophe, which means it’s the product of two words: they are.

Is it your or you’re welcome?

YOUR is a possessive pronoun. There is nothing possessive in YOUR welcome so you can’t use it in this instance. The correct answer is YOU’RE. YOU’RE is a contraction for YOU ARE and the technical phrase is YOU ARE WELCOME.

Is it your pretty or you’re pretty?

The homophones your and you’re often confuses even native English speakers. Your is a possessive adjective. It is always followed by a noun in a sentence. You’re is a contraction of two words, “you” and “are.” Contractions can be easily recognized by the apostrophe.

Who you are or who are you?

Whom should be used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition. When in doubt, try this simple trick: If you can replace the word with “he”’ or “’she,” use who. If you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom. Who should be used to refer to the subject of a sentence.

What are called in English?

There are 14 punctuation marks that are commonly used in English grammar. They are the period, question mark, exclamation point, comma, semicolon, colon, dash, hyphen, parentheses, brackets, braces, apostrophe, quotation marks, and ellipsis.

Where do we use their?

Their is the possessive pronoun, as in “their car is red”; there is used as an adjective, “he is always there for me,” a noun, “get away from there,” and, chiefly, an adverb, “stop right there”; they’re is a contraction of “they are,” as in “they’re getting married.”

What the difference between its and it’s?

It’s is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.” Its is a possessive determiner we use to say that something belongs to or refers to something. … They are pronounced the same, there’s a very small difference in how they’re written, and it’s also easy to mistake the contraction in it’s for a possessive.